ideation / Meandering / Perception

Meandering Monday about the Fickleness of Fantasies

Did you ever find yourself disappointed in a movie because the dragons just don’t look real? (What does a real dragon look like, anyway?) We like our fantasies to be realistic. Of course, we want the negative, frightening, and painful fantasies to be unlikely (like Aliens), but that’s another matter. Back to dragons: who knows but that someday some enterprising archaeologists or other type of explorers will discover that dragons really did exist, and they’ll move out of fantasy.

The difference between Fact and Fantasy can be just a matter of time. If someone living in the Middle Ages wanted to fly, well, that was pure fantasy. In the Renaissance they might have seen one of Da Vinci’s drawings and thought that it could happen in their lifetime – until it couldn’t. In the 1920’s it was possible, but still a fantasy for most. Now, flight seems a fantasy for very few people.

(Part of the difficulty with writing science fiction is that if you write about an advancement too close to when it’s going to happen, your idea won’t be interesting because people can already see the real thing. And if you write too far into the future, discoveries will come along that will make your attempts at prescience seem like the uneducated ravings of a Neanderthal.)

What about my fantasy that I could go to Mars? When I was born, it was definitely the stuff of science fiction and fantasy, but when Apollo 11 – 17 were happening on our television screens, it seemed very much a reality – almost not a fantasy at all. I fully thought it possible that I could take a trip to Mars some time in my lifetime, maybe even as an astronaut; if not, I could settle for being a colonist – or maybe just a tourist, but that would be further in the future, and I had plenty of time.

And then since the mid-1970’s, a trip to Mars slid firmly back into the realms of fantasy. No humans were leaving orbit anymore, and the possibility of Mars slipped from my grasp.

Here I am at the age of 60, and now I’m starting to think it could happen again. It’s possible that a ticket to Mars could be had for a half-million dollars (or less) by the time I’m 70. Do I think I’ll have the money in ten years? No, but it IS possible. And it may not be until I’m 90, so that getting there is about all the time I have left to me, but that’s not the same thing as saying “never gonna happen.”

Time to start talking my wife into that Mars trip (now there’s a REAL fantasy.)

Just saying…

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VictimlessCover“Victimless” will release on June 30th:

A murderer’s defense team proposes a novel approach to making crime truly victimless (or at least as victimless as it can be, considering it IS a crime.)

“Victimless” is a speculative fiction short story. It is currently available for preorder on all the usual sites, including, but not limited to:

Smashwords:  https://www.smashwords.com/books/view/732206?ref=NoTimeToThink

Amazon:  https://www.smashwords.com/books/view/732206

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JD2DowntownBluesCoverWilliam Mangieri’s writing, including his most recent publication Downtown Blues:  Detective Jimmy Delaney Collection #2,  can be found in many places, including:
• Smashwords:  https://www.smashwords.com/profile/view/NoTimeToThink
• His Amazon Author page:  http://www.amazon.com/-/e/B008O8CBDY
• Barnes & Noble:  http://www.barnesandnoble.com/s/william-mangieri?store=book&keyword=william+mangieri
• Createspace (if you prefer physical books):  https://www.createspace.com/pub/simplesitesearch.search.do?sitesearch_query=william+mangieri&sitesearch_type=STORE
To CONNECT WITH HIM (and LIKE and FOLLOW), go to
• His site on WordPress:  https://williammangieri.wordpress.com
• “William Mangieri’s Writing Page” on Facebook at:  http://www.facebook.com/NoTimeToThink
• His Goodreads author page:  http://www.goodreads.com/author/show/6893616.William_Mangieri
• Or on twitter: @WilliaMangieri

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One thought on “Meandering Monday about the Fickleness of Fantasies

  1. Pingback: Forecast Friday: Inspiring Hope | William Mangieri's Writing Page

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